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3 Officer Insignias Major Capt Cloth Shoulder Rank Badge Patches

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 348893006473434980 3 Officer Insignias Major Capt Cloth Shoulder Rank Badge Patches

3 Officer Insignias Major Capt Cloth Shoulder Rank Patches You are bidding on a three Officer Rank Insignias. These insignias are cloth patch style, the Major patches are 2 inches across and the Captain patch is 1.75 inches across. Please look at the pictures BEFORE bidding. Thanks for Looking and good luck bidding. Major (United States) From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Major is a commisioned officer's rank used in the U.S. Army, Air Force, and Marine Corps, and is the equivalent of a lieutenant commander in the Navy and Coast Guard. The insignia consists of a fanned cluster of gold oak leaves, although there are design differences between the Army/Air Force version and the Marine Corps version. The rank of major is considered the first field grade officer and warrants gold trim on the visor of the cap (silver trim for the USAF). A major in the U.S. Army typically serves as the battalion commander, battalion executive officer, or as the primary staff officer for brigade and task force command regarding personnel, logistical and operational missions. In addition, majors command augmented companies in Combat Service and Service Support units. A major in the Air Force typically has duties as a senior staff officer at the squadron level. In flying squadrons majors are generally flight commanders or assistant directors of operations. In the mission support and maintenance groups majors may occasionally be squadron commanders. In the medical group a major may be the head of a clinic or flight. The rank is also used in some police departments. Insignia of (O-4) U.S. Army and United States Air Force Major Insignia of (O-4) U.S. Marine Corps Major Lieutenant From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Lieutenant is a military, naval, paramilitary, fire service or police officer rank. Lieutenant may also appear as part of a title used in various other organizations with a codified command structure. It often designates someone who is "second-in-command," and as such, may precede the name of the rank directly above it. For example, a "Lieutenant Master" is likely to be second-in-command to the "Master" in an organization utilizing both such ranks. Notable uses include Lieutenant Governor in various governments, and Quebec lieutenant in Canadian politics. Etymology The word lieutenant derives from French; the lieu meaning "place" as in a position; and tenant meaning "holding" as in "holding a position"; thus a "lieutenant" is somebody who holds a position in the absence of his or her superior (compare the cognate Latin locum tenens). The Arabic word for lieutenant, mul?zim (Arabic: ?????), also means "holding a place". The British monarch's representatives in the counties of the United Kingdom are called Lords Lieutenant. The Lord Lieutenant of Ireland performed the function of viceroy in Ireland. In French history, "lieutenant du roi" was a title borne by the officer sent with military powers to represent the king in certain provinces. It is in the sense of a deputy that it has entered into the titles of more senior officers, Lieutenant General and Lieutenant Colonel. In the nineteenth century those British writers who either considered this word an imposition on the English language or difficult for common soldiers and sailors argued for it to be replaced by the calque "steadholder" but failed and the French word is still used as well as its Lieutenant-Colonel variation in both the Old and the New World. Folk-etymological interpretations: "left-tenant" In the past, folk etymology has associated the /l?v/-/l?f/ syllable with the verb 'to leave', drolly emphasizing that a lieutenant only took up his duties once his superior officer had 'left'. Another folk etymology attributed the syllable to the fact that in typical propriety the person or persons standing to the rear-left of a gentleman held power and were typically those directly second to him. The person or persons standing to the rear-right were considered to have no or less standing than those to the rear-left, such as aides, bodyguards, wives, etc., often holding this position for simple facility rather than societal importance. This tradition remains in military parades, with lieutenants standing to the rear-left of the commanding officer (when facing the advance). Navy Lieutenant From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Lieutenant is a military, naval, paramilitary, fire service or police officer rank. Lieutenant may also appear as part of a title used in various other organizations with a codified command structure. It often designates someone who is "second-in-command," and as such, may precede the name of the rank directly above it. For example, a "Lieutenant Master" is likely to be second-in-command to the "Master" in an organization utilizing both such ranks. Notable uses include Lieutenant Governor in various governments, and Quebec lieutenant in Canadian politics. Etymology The word lieutenant derives from French; the lieu meaning "place" as in a position; and tenant meaning "holding" as in "holding a position"; thus a "lieutenant" is somebody who holds a position in the absence of his or her superior (compare the cognate Latin locum tenens). The Arabic word for lieutenant, mul?zim (Arabic: ?????), also means "holding a place". The British monarch's representatives in the counties of the United Kingdom are called Lords Lieutenant. The Lord Lieutenant of Ireland performed the function of viceroy in Ireland. In French history, "lieutenant du roi" was a title borne by the officer sent with military powers to represent the king in certain provinces. It is in the sense of a deputy that it has entered into the titles of more senior officers, Lieutenant General and Lieutenant Colonel. In the nineteenth century those British writers who either considered this word an imposition on the English language or difficult for common soldiers and sailors argued for it to be replaced by the calque "steadholder" but failed and the French word is still used as well as its Lieutenant-Colonel variation in both the Old and the New World. Folk-etymological interpretations: "left-tenant" In the past, folk etymology has associated the /l?v/-/l?f/ syllable with the verb 'to leave', drolly emphasizing that a lieutenant only took up his duties once his superior officer had 'left'. Another folk etymology attributed the syllable to the fact that in typical propriety the person or persons standing to the rear-left of a gentleman held power and were typically those directly second to him. The person or persons standing to the rear-right were considered to have no or less standing than those to the rear-left, such as aides, bodyguards, wives, etc., often holding this position for simple facility rather than societal importance. This tradition remains in military parades, with lieutenants standing to the rear-left of the commanding officer (when facing the advance). Rank insignia A US Navy Lieutenant's shoulder/shirt collar/cap insignia The insignia of a Lieutenant in many navies, including the Royal Navy, consists of two medium gold braid stripes (top stripe with loop) on a 'navy blue'/black background. This pattern was copied by the United States Navy and various Air Forces for their equivalent ranks grades (see Flight Lieutenant). Unlike the United States Navy, which uses different insignia to distinguish specialists, the Royal Navy and other Commonwealth navies differentiated between line and specialist officers by placing coloured bands (known as 'lights') between the braids. These were abolished in the RN in 1955 (with other navies following suit), except for scarlet for medical officers (introduced in 1863) and orange for dental officers (introduced in 1924), which are still used. The former colours were: light blue for navigating officers (1863–1867 only), and in the 20th century for instructor officers; white for paymaster officers (from 1863); purple for engineer officers (from 1863); silver grey for shipwright officers (from 1918); dark green for electrical officers (from 1918); maroon, later replaced by salmon pink, for wardmaster officers (commissioned medical assistants) (from 1918); and dark blue for ordnance officers (from 1918). Rarely seen these days is the rank insignia worn on formal tail-coats, which comprises a silver anchor and a star on a shoulder-board covered with gold lace. In armies, marines and other services, there is much greater variation. In most English-speaking and Arabic-speaking countries, as well as a number of European and South American nations, full lieutenants (and equivalents) usually wear two stars and second lieutenants (and equivalents) one. The United States Army, Air Force and Marine Corps are notable exceptions. These services distinguish their lieutenant ranks with one silver bar for First Lieutenant and one gold (brass) bar for Second Lieutenant. Naval lieutenants also wear bars in the same configuration as their equivalents in the other services. In the United States services stars are used for flag- and general-rank insignia. In the British Army and Royal Marines a Lieutenant is distinguished by two diamond-shaped "pips" on the rank slide. Prior to the 1968 unification of the Canadian Forces, the Canadian Army and Royal Canadian Navy followed the British pattern for second lieutenants and lieutenants. After unification, a second lieutenant wore a single gold ring around the cuff of the "CF Green" uniform and on shirt-sleeve epaulettes. A Lieutenant wore a single gold ring with a thinner one above it. On paper, these ranks applied to "army", "navy" and "air force" personnel, but in practise, aboard ship "naval" personnel (the former RCN was a very strong opponent of unification) continued to use the "acting sublieutenant", "sublieutenant" and "lieutenant" titles, until these were recognised by the Canadian Department of National Defence for Canadian Forces Maritime Command personnel. In the mid-1980s, the "naval" and "air" components reverted to uniforms similar to the former RCN and RCAF. Maritime Command kept their naval ranks but Air Command continued to use "second lieutenant" and "lieutenant" rather than reverting to pre-1968 RCAF ranks. Captain (United States Armed Forces) From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia U.S. Army, Air Force, and Marines In the United States Army, Air Force, and Marine Corps, captain is the rank above first lieutenant and below the rank of major. The pay grade for an officer of this rank is O-3, and promotion occurs at the 48th month of commissioned service. Army Captains generally command company-sized units. When given such a command, they bear the title Company Commander. Captains also instruct at service schools and combat training centers and are often staff officers at the battalion level. In medical units (in all services), captain is the entry-level rank for doctors and those possessing a Doctor of Pharmacy. In Judge Advocate General units in all services, captain or first lieutenant is the entry-level rank for lawyers who already have their juris doctor degree and have been admitted to the bar of at least one state. Captains in the United States Marine Corps are also sometimes referred to as "skipper" in informal situations; this term for a captain is most often used by senior staff non-commissioned officers. Air Force captains' authority varies by group assignment. In the operations group, senior captains may be flight commanders while more junior captains may be heads of departments. In the maintenance and mission support groups they are almost always flight commanders. In the medical group captains usually have little administrative responsibility as captain is the entry level rank for many medical officers. Captains in the MSC, BSC, and NC corps, however, are sometimes assigned as flight commanders. Rank equivalency between services Due to the ambiguity created by the common use of "captain" for officers of different grades between the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard, equivalency is conferred between officers by use of identical pay grade rather than title of rank. The higher the number of the grade, the higher the rank of the officer. For example, an Army, Air Force, or Marine captain is equivalent in rank, responsibilities, and grade to a Navy or Coast Guard lieutenant, all of which are of the third officer grade, or O-3. Similarly, a Navy or Coast Guard captain is equivalent in rank, responsibilities, and grade to an Army, Air Force, or Marine colonel, all of which are of the sixth officer grade, or O-6. Thus, Army, Air Force, and Marine colonels together with Navy and Coast Guard captains wear the silver eagle insignia of their grade O-6, while Army, Air Force, and Marine captains together with Navy and Coast Guard lieutenants wear a pair of silver bars as their rank insignia in the grade O-3. Early history The rank of captain first appeared in the United States Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War. A captain was the officer placed in charge of a company of soldiers and was granted a commission from the regimental Colonel. A captain was afforded one to several Lieutenants, depending on the size of the company, and the captain’s commission could be revoked or expired at the end of a particular military campaign. Lieutenant From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Lieutenant is a military, naval, paramilitary, fire service or police officer rank. Lieutenant may also appear as part of a title used in various other organizations with a codified command structure. It often designates someone who is "second-in-command," and as such, may precede the name of the rank directly above it. For example, a "Lieutenant Master" is likely to be second-in-command to the "Master" in an organization utilizing both such ranks. Notable uses include Lieutenant Governor in various governments, and Quebec lieutenant in Canadian politics. Etymology The word lieutenant derives from French; the lieu meaning "place" as in a position; and tenant meaning "holding" as in "holding a position"; thus a "lieutenant" is somebody who holds a position in the absence of his or her superior (compare the cognate Latin locum tenens). The Arabic word for lieutenant, mul?zim (Arabic: ?????), also means "holding a place". The British monarch's representatives in the counties of the United Kingdom are called Lords Lieutenant. The Lord Lieutenant of Ireland performed the function of viceroy in Ireland. In French history, "lieutenant du roi" was a title borne by the officer sent with military powers to represent the king in certain provinces. It is in the sense of a deputy that it has entered into the titles of more senior officers, Lieutenant General and Lieutenant Colonel. In the nineteenth century those British writers who either considered this word an imposition on the English language or difficult for common soldiers and sailors argued for it to be replaced by the calque "steadholder" but failed and the French word is still used as well as its Lieutenant-Colonel variation in both the Old and the New World. Folk-etymological interpretations: "left-tenant" In the past, folk etymology has associated the /l?v/-/l?f/ syllable with the verb 'to leave', drolly emphasizing that a lieutenant only took up his duties once his superior officer had 'left'. Another folk etymology attributed the syllable to the fact that in typical propriety the person or persons standing to the rear-left of a gentleman held power and were typically those directly second to him. The person or persons standing to the rear-right were considered to have no or less standing than those to the rear-left, such as aides, bodyguards, wives, etc., often holding this position for simple facility rather than societal importance. This tradition remains in military parades, with lieutenants standing to the rear-left of the commanding officer (when facing the advance). Shipping discount for multiple purchases as follows: First item is full price shipping, second thru sixth auction/item is an additional $.25. I will not combine ship more than six items/auctions at one time. All Auctions must be won within a 72 hour period. Exceptions are allowed if you email me first. Thanks for looking and good luck!

 348893006473434981 3 Officer Insignias Major Capt Cloth Shoulder Rank Badge Patches

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